Why is electric field inside an insulator nonzero?

10
Rickey Langworth asked a question: Why is electric field inside an insulator nonzero?
Asked By: Rickey Langworth
Date created: Tue, Feb 9, 2021 9:09 AM
Date updated: Thu, Jun 23, 2022 2:18 PM

Content

Top best answers to the question «Why is electric field inside an insulator nonzero»

Why does an insulator create an electric field?

  • Any charged object positive or negative , conductor or insulator creates an electric field that permeates the space surrounding it . A conductor is a material that allows electrons to move freely from atom to atom.

9 other answers

Why is the electric field inside an insulator not zero? This is attributed to the fact that the electrons are loosely bound to the nuclei and they are free to rearrange themselves until the net field becomes zero. But in an ...

I had read from several sources that electric field inside a conductor is zero. This is attributed to the fact that the electrons are loosely bound to the nuclei and they are free to rearrange themselves until the net field becomes zero. But in an insulator the electrons are tightly bound to the nuclei. So they can resist movement even at more ...

Maybe you forget the word “hollow “ before sphere, cause in a solid insulating sphere the charge don’t need to move to surface, there is non zero field inside because in any closed surface inside you still have charge (proportionalr 3

but why, I argue that, even when the electric field is not zero everywhere inside the conductor, there is still a chance for the charges to be stationary! For example, imagine that, there is a spherical conductor, all the charges of positive are distributed uniformly over the surface.

1) Place a gaussian surface inside the conductor. Since the system is at equilibrium, all points on the surface must have an electric field of zero. 2) Therefore the net flux is zero, implying the charge inside is zero. 3) If there is no charge inside, all excess charge must lie on the surface.

Also, the electric field inside a conductor is zero. (This, also, is because of the free movement of charges. If there was a net electric field inside, the charges would rearrange because of it, and cancel it out.) Therefore, all the charge has to lie on the surface of the conductor.

This is why we can assume that there are no charges inside a conducting sphere. Also, the electric field inside a conductor is zero. Therefore, all the charge has to lie on the surface of the conductor. (As this is the only part of the conductor outside your Gaussian surface.)

The electromagnetic field is a local property of the vacuum, governed by Maxwell's equations. The relevant one in this case is. That is, at any point in space, a changing magnitude or direction for the magnetic field is inextricably associated with an electric field with nonzero curl.

It has to do with conservation of energy. If the curl of the electric field were nonzero, the line integral around a closed loop could also be nonzero. Then if a charged particle followed such a path, it could end up at the same place it

Your Answer