What do you mean by electric dipole and electric dipole moment?

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Destini Gaylord asked a question: What do you mean by electric dipole and electric dipole moment?
Asked By: Destini Gaylord
Date created: Sat, May 1, 2021 2:48 AM
Date updated: Fri, Oct 21, 2022 6:06 AM

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Top best answers to the question «What do you mean by electric dipole and electric dipole moment»

An electric dipole is a separation of positive and negative charges. The electric dipole moment is the product of the magnitude of the charge and the distance between the centres of positive and negative charges.

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Ans: The electric dipole and dipole moment are two different terms. An electric dipole is a pair of equal and opposite charges separated by a considerably short distance, whereas an electric dipole moment is the product of the magnitude of charges and the separation between them.

Answer: Electric dipole is the distance between the centre of the two charges bearing equal magnitude with opposite signs, however, electric dipole moment measures the strength of the electric dipole.

An electric dipole is a pair of equal and opposite charges q and – q separated by some fixed distance. A dipole moment vector p has a magnitude of 2 q a, and it is in the direction of the dipole axis from – q to q. Electric field due to an electric dipole on the axis at a distance r from the centre is given as:

An electric dipole is defined as a couple of opposite charges q and –q separated by a distance d. By default, the direction of electric dipoles in space is always from negative charge -q to positive charge q. The midpoint q and –q is called the centre of the dipole. The simplest example of an electric dipole is a pair of electric charges of ...

Do remember that, the dipole moment is a vector measure whose direction runs from negative to a positive charge. The formula for electric dipole moment for a pair of equal & opposite charges is p = q d, the magnitude of the charges multiplied by the distance between the two. Download Conductors and Insulators Cheat Sheet PDF

A dipole is a separation of opposite electrical charges and it is quantified by an electric dipole moment.

How much charge is actually transferred can be quantified by studying the electric dipole moment of the bond, which is a quantity that can be measured experimentally. The electric dipole moment for a diatomic with charges Q1 = Q = δe and Q2 = − Q = − δe on atoms 1 and 2, respectively, is μ = Q1r1 + Q2r2 = Qr1 − Qr2 = Q(r1 − r2)

For electric dipole: The direction of the dipole moment is from negative to positive charge, but that of the electrostatic field is from positive to negative. But in the case of magnetostatics, the magnetic field and dipole moment have the same direction. Isn't that a bit strange? Or am I missing something?

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