Does argon behave like an ideal gas?

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Mckenna Bogan asked a question: Does argon behave like an ideal gas?
Asked By: Mckenna Bogan
Date created: Wed, Jun 16, 2021 1:02 PM
Date updated: Tue, Jul 26, 2022 6:37 PM

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Video answer: 1.3 deviation from ideal gas behaviour

1.3 deviation from ideal gas behaviour

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An ``ideal'' gas is one with point-like, non-interacting molecules… The behaviour of all gases tends to that of an ideal gas at low enough pressures; at STP noble gases such as argon are very close to ideal, and even air is reasonably approximated as ideal.

Video answer: Kinetic molecular theory of gases

Kinetic molecular theory of gases

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Does argon behave like an ideal gas? An “ideal” gas is one with point-like, non-interacting molecules. The behaviour of all gases tends to that of an ideal gas at low enough pressures; at STP noble gases such as argon are very close to ideal, and even air is reasonably approximated as ideal.

Ideal Gas Law is an Approximation The ideal gas law describes how gases behave, but does not account for molecular size or intermolecular forces. Since molecules and atoms in all real gases have size and exert force on each other, the ideal gas law is only an approximation, albeit a very good one for many real gases.

Noble or inert gases like helium, argon, neon, and xenon behave most like an ideal gas. What is meant by the term 'ideal gas'? An ideal gas is a theoretical gas composed of a set of

Updated December 06, 2019. The real gas that acts most like an ideal gas is helium. This is because helium, unlike most gases, exists as a single atom, which makes the van der Waals dispersion forces as low as possible. Another factor is that helium, like other noble gases, has a completely filled outer electron shell.

Under normal conditions such as normal pressure and temperature conditions, most real gases behave qualitatively as an ideal gas. Many gases such as air, nitrogen, oxygen, hydrogen, noble gases, and some heavy gases such as carbon dioxide can be treated as ideal gases within a reasonable tolerance.

At 'higher temperature' and 'lower pressure', a gas behaves like an ideal gas, as the potential energy due to intermolecular forces becomes less significant compared with the particles' kinetic energy, and the size of the molecules becomes less significant compared to the empty space between them.

Explanation: Of course, an ideal gas does not exist except as a conceptual notion, an ideal. Physicists and chemists idealized the behaviour of real gases so that they could explain these phenomena. Under conditions of low pressure and high temperature, all gases behave like real gases , even gases such as UF6 .

Active Oldest Votes. 1. Noble gases are especially good approximations of an ideal gas because they are monatomic and interact only by van der Waals forces, which unfortunately (and especially with larger noble-gas atoms) affect any gas to some extent. See here for a model that tries addressing this. Helium is least susceptible to these concerns.

According to the kinetic theory, PV is two-thirds the total molecular kinetic energy and should remain constant at a given temperature for a given amount of gas. That it does not is evident from Figure 9.18. 1, where PV for 1 mol CH 4 ( g) is plotted versus P. At high pressures, PV is always larger than would be predicted by the ideal gas law.

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Video answer: Average kinetic energy of a gas and root mean square…

Average kinetic energy of a gas and root mean square…