Can the electric field by a small dipole be zero?

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Antone Pfeffer asked a question: Can the electric field by a small dipole be zero?
Asked By: Antone Pfeffer
Date created: Sat, Jul 3, 2021 2:04 AM
Date updated: Mon, Sep 26, 2022 1:17 AM

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Top best answers to the question «Can the electric field by a small dipole be zero»

If dipole moment p is zero, then E=0,but then there is no dipole which is simply defined as two equal and opposite point charges separated by finite distance. This is not possible and hence field of a dipole is not zero.

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-20 a + Can the electric field by a small dipole be zero at a finite distance from electric dipole? me and molecules can be treated as electric dinoles

The electric field inside a capacitor is where A is the surface area of each electrode. Outside the +capacitor plates, where E – and E have equal magnitudes but opposite directions, the electric field is zero.

If dipole moment p is zero, then E=0,but then there is no dipole which is simply defined as two equal and opposite point charges separated by finite distance. This is not possible and hence field of a dipole is not zero. PLZ MARK ME AS BRAINLIEST!!!!!

Can the electric field by a small dipole be zero at a finite distance from electric dipole?

The electric field due to small dipole, at point (r, theta), where r is distance from center of the dipole and (theta) is angle between r and dipole,is given by E=(kp/r^3)[sqrt(1+3cos^2 theta). If dipole moment p is zero, then E=0,but then there is no dipole which is simply defined as two equal and opposite point charges separated by finite distance.

Read all answers to question:Help me :::Can the electric field by a small dipole be zero at a finite distance from electric dipole? I am not getting the ques

We also know that for small distances (d), we can claim that In this lab we will determine the electric fields and with that information find the charge of the dipole (the total charge will be zero because it is made up of two equal but opposite charges, but by convention we refer to the charge of dipole as the value on the positive charge).

We already know that if we go infinite distance away from the dipole, the electric field will go to zero. In other words, it will not give us something new. What we are interested in is that these are our charges, our dipole charges with plus q and minus q and there is d and we’re at a point, p, such that this distance z, from the center of the dipole, is much greater than d.

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